BU Future of Food Conference – wild fermentation

May 7, 2009 in farm, Humble Garden

for blog (NOT MINE)

(Lactobacillus god – Sandorkraut)

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A couple of weeks ago, while twittering, I heard about this conference at Boston University called “The Future of Food: Transatlantic Perspectives” which will happen this coming weekend (May 8-9, 2009).

Its sort of shocking how close I came to totally missing out on this conference.

I have pasted at the bottom of this post, the schedule that they have put together! You can also visit the same schedule at this link.

Note that a whole lot of it is free and open to the public!

While I am not able to attend all of the great festivities (I live 1.5 hours outside of Boston so this is a field trip for me) I am making it a priority to attend a particular workshop, to be held this Friday (tomorrow) from 2:30 to 5:00.

for blog (NOT MINE)

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Fermentation lecture and workshop: Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods
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Join Sandor Ellix Katz (aka Sandorkraut), author of Wild Fermentation and The Revolution Will Not Be Microwaved, for this workshop. Learn how easy it is to make sauerkraut, pickles and other live-culture ferments in your own kitchen. Highly nutritious and filled with life, fermented foods have a long history and a promising future. Empower yourself to create these delicious and healthful foods!

I have been wanting to buy this book and never thought I would actually get a chance to SEE Sandor speak in person so I am quite excited about this workshop.

Fermentation may seem like an arcane skill to learn but if you garden, like I do (see our garden blog at Humble Garden) it is hugely important to be able to do ferments to put up some of the harvest.

While fermenting is not hard (the bacteria do all the hard work) its best if you get a good foundation up front so that you do not waste food due to ignorance of important practices and also because you do not know what a good and a bad ferment looks like!

One last word on fermentation – its not just about preserving food. Fermentation is the process of changing or morphing foods from a fresh state to some new and improved collective organism made up of a whole, complex and dynamic bacterial ecology where lactobacillus bacteria produce lactic acid that inhibits pathogenic (toxic) bacterial species and ALSO unlocks nutrients, co-factors, and vitamins from the original food.

Sandor has completely immersed himself in a fermenting world and seems to be wholly dedicated to bringing it to the rest of us!

for blog (NOT MINE)

You can learn so much more by visiting his web site at this link.

At this workshop, I will also get a copy of his book (hope to get it signed and add it to my growing collection of signed book copies – see this link)

for blog (NOT MINE)

Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods

I will be doing this tomorrow and then report back here after that!

Conference Schedule

Friday, May 8, 2009

Fermentation lecture and workshop: Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods

Join Sandor Ellix Katz (aka Sandorkraut), author of Wild Fermentation and The Revolution Will Not Be Microwaved, for this workshop. Learn how easy it is to make sauerkraut, pickles and other live-culture ferments in your own kitchen. Highly nutritious and filled with life, fermented foods have a long history and a promising future. Empower yourself to create these delicious and healthful foods!

2:30 PM – 5:00 PM
808 Commonwealth Avenue (Fuller Building)
Demonstration Room

Seating limited | $30 includes signed copy of Wild Fermentation | $20 without book.

LAST DAY TO REGISTER FOR “WILD FERMENTATION” IS THURSDAY, APRIL 30!

If you have questions about the workshop, please contact Kate Seif at clseif@bu.edu or 610-420-7854.

Lecture, cooking-demo and dinner: Cooking with a Conscience

Featuring ec0-chef, author, and food-justice activist Bryant Terry

Bryant Terry is a nationally recognized eco chef, author, and food justice activist. He is currently a Food and Society Policy Fellow, a national program of the WK Kellogg Foundation. He is co-author, with Anna Lappé, of Grub: Ideas for an Urban Organic Kitchen and author of the recently released Vegan Soul Kitchen. With the help of a Kellogg Foundation Food and Society Policy Fellowship, he has started the Southern Organic Kitchen Project in order to educate primarily African-Americans living in the Southern United States about the connections between diet and health.

Dinner (see menu) features recipes from Bryant’s Vegan Soul Kitchen.

5:30 PM – 7:30 PM
808 Commonwealth Avenue (Fuller Building)
Demonstration Room

Seating limited | $45.00 includes signed copy of Vegan Soul Kitchen

LAST DAY TO REGISTER FOR “COOKING WITH A CONSCIENCE” IS THURSDAY, APRIL 30!

If you have questions about the dinner with Bryant Terry, please contact Kate Seif at clseif@bu.edu or 610-420-7854.

Film Screening and discussion: King Corn

King Corn is a feature documentary about two friends, one acre of corn, and the subsidized crop that drives our fast-food nation.

In King Corn, Ian Cheney and Curt Ellis, best friends from college on the east coast, move to the heartland to learn where their food comes from. With the help of friendly neighbors, genetically modified seeds, and powerful herbicides, they plant and grow a bumper crop of America’s most-productive, most-subsidized grain on one acre of Iowa soil. But when they try to follow their pile of corn into the food system, what they find raises troubling questions about how we eat – and how we farm.

Film-screening will be introduced by Ian Cheney, filmmaker, and followed by discussion with Aaron Woolf, director.

8:00 PM – 10:00 PM
Boston University Law School
Auditorium | Barristers’ Hall
765 Commonwealth Avenue
[Directions]

Free and open to the public | Reception to follow

Saturday, May 9, 2009

International Conference: The Future of Food: Transatlantic Perspectives

Free and open to the public

(includes all panels, breakfast, coffee breaks, reception)

8:00 AM – 8:45 AM: Breakfast and Registration

8:45 AM – 9:00 AM: Introductions
9:00 AM – 9:30 AM: Opening Keynote Address – Satish Kumar, Editor, Resurgence

9:30 AM – 11:00 AM: Session I: From Farm to Fork: The Global Food Chain

This session traces the increasingly obscure path of food from “farm to fork.” The focus is on food production and the industrialization of agriculture. It will consider the growing influence of “agribusiness” and the “politics of food.” Our goals are to explore the alignment (or lack thereof) of business and consumer interests and the impact of the transformation of the food system on culture.

Participants:
Helena Norberg-Hodge, founder and director of the International Society for Ecology and Culture (ISEC)
Henrik Selin, Professor of International Relations, Boston University
Mark Winne, author of Closing the Food Gap: Resetting the Table in the Land of Plenty
Moderator: James McCann, Professor of History and Associate Director for Development, African Studies Center, Boston University

11:00 AM – 11:30AM: Coffee Break

11:30 AM – 1:00 PM: Session II: The End of Cheap Food: Food and Geopolitics

This session will center on “food security.” It will address the rising cost of food and the “fuel vs. food” debate. Is the growing demand for biofuels responsible for food inflation? Other threats to food security will also be explored, namely, fossil fuel dependence, loss of biodiversity, and water shortages.

Participants:
Benedikt Haerlin, Foundation on Future Farming | Save Our Seeds
Jim Harkness, President, Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy
Tim Wise, Director of the Research and Policy Program at the Global Development and Environment Institute, Tufts University
Moderator: Cutler Cleveland, Professor of Geography and Environmental Science, Boston University

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM: Vegetarian lunch with guest speakers

Seating limited | $15.00 | Please indicate when registering whether or not you will attend the lunch.

LAST DAY TO REGISTER FOR LUNCH IS THURSDAY, APRIL 30!

2:00 PM – 3:30 PM: Session III: What’s in What You Eat? Food Safety in a New Ecology

This panel focuses on “food safety” with an emphasis on regulation in the United States and Europe, the GMO debate, recent “food scares,” and the looming threat of bioterrorism.

Participants:
Benedikt Haerlin, Foundation on Future Farming | Save Our Seeds
Helen Holder, GM Campaign Coordinator for Friends of the Earth Europe
Andrew Kimbrell, Executive Director, Center for Food Safety
Moderator: Adil Najam, Director of the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future, Boston University

3:30 PM – 4:00 PM: Coffee Break

4:00 PM – 5:30 PM: Session IV: Eating Green: Food and Climate Change

This panel looks at the relationship between food production and climate change, addressing issues of deforestation, soil degradation, and factory farms and considers whether what we eat can make a difference.

Participants:
Daniel Hillel, Center for Climate Systems Research, Columbia University
Björn-Ola Linnér, Linköping University, the Tema Institute
Mia MacDonald, Founder and Executive Director, Brighter Green
Cynthia Rosenzweig, Center for Climate Systems Research, Columbia University
Moderator: Henrik Selin, Professor of International Relations, Boston University

5:30 PM – 6:00 PM: Coffee Break

6:00 PM – 7:30 PM: Session V: What Is “Good” Food? The Ethics of Eating

Is “good” food healthy, sustainable, delectable or cheap? This panel explores why our food choices matter. It addresses the “ethics of eating” and the health and environmental costs of “cheap food.” It looks at some of the grassroots alternatives including the rise of organic farming, locavorism, and the “slow food” movement.

Participants:
Sandor Ellix Katz, author of Wild Fermentation and The Revolution Will Not Be Microwaved
Satish Kumar, Editor, Resurgence
Harriet Lamb, Executive Director, Fair Trade Foundation
Helena Norberg-Hodge, founder and director of the International Society for Ecology and Culture (ISEC)
Moderator: Molly Anderson, independent consultant on science and policy for sustainability

7:30 PM – 8:00 PM: Closing Keynote Address
Michael Ableman, farmer, author, and photographer and a recognized practitioner of sustainable agriculture and proponent of regional food systems

8:00 PM – 8:30 PM: Reception

Location:
Boston University Law School
Auditorium | Barristers’ Hall
765 Commonwealth Avenue
[Directions]

All Saturday events, with exception of lunch, are free and open to the public. Registration in advance is appreciated and helps us with planning.

Note: There will be no admittance while sessions are in process or after 6:00 PM. Please plan your travel to arrive before the start of the session(s) you would like to attend.

If you have questions about the conference, please contact Elizabeth Amrien at eamrien@bu.edu or 617-358-2778.